Rodney’s Bookstore: Books are just the beginning

I visited Rodney’s Bookstore, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, last week. Went with a good friend of mine, Aja Jackson, founder of MindUTeach. Whenever I venture to Rodney’s, I never leave empty-handed. They specialize in used books, and their prices are very reasonable. Here’s what I picked up:

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Bed Crumbs: Sweet Dreams and Nightmares by John Kruth. Jackalope Press. 1986.

So Bed Crumbs: Sweet Dreams and Nightmares, by John Kruth, is chalk full of witty and wonderful poems. I saw this book sitting by the register. I opened it up and turned to this poem, that sold me on the purchase:

Lucifer’s Puberty

I’m not sure why

I’m beginning to sprout horns

and unknown alphabets

appear from my pen

~~~

Mama used to call me

her “little angel”

now I put tabasco

on everything”

– Kruth pg. 9

Bed Crumbs by John Kruth

Published by Jackalope Press 1986

I recommend this book for: 7th grade and up.

Retail Paperback: $6.00 Rodney’s: $2.82

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Juneteenth Jamboree by Carole Boston Weatherford. Illustrated by Yvonne Buchanan. Lee & Low Books, Inc. 1995

Personally, I’ve never seen a picture book about the United States’ holiday, Juneteenth. The fact that the book is published by one of my most favorite and trusted publishers, Lee & Low, made it an immediate purchase even more so. Out of all the captivating illustrations that artist, Yvonne Buchanan gives us, the illustration below stood out to me the most. Look how fun the kitchen can be! This book should be a staple in all elementary classrooms, in the United States.

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“Cassandra raced into the kitchen, then stopped in her tracks. Dishes lined the countertop. From the looks of the place, her parents had big plans.” – Weatherford. ~ Illustration by Yvonne Buchanan in Juneteenth Jamboree

Juneteenth Jamboree by Carole Boston Weatherford. Illustrated by Yvonne Buchanan.

Lee & Low Books, Inc. 1995.

I recommend this for: All ages.

Retail Paperback: $7.95. Rodney’s: $2.82

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Brown Angels: An Album of Pictures and Verse by Walter Dean Myers. Harper Collins 1993.

Brown Angels: An Album of Pictures and Verse, by Walter Dean Myers, stole my heart. This collection, of pictures and verse, is a celebration of youth, in times past, in African-American communities. It highlights the joys and beauties, reminding us that not everything was a hardship, in the black communities of the United States. This book scaffolds a sense of thriving and fulfillment; and can contribute to young children’s sense of resiliency. If I still had a Kindergarten classroom, I would keep this book in the Dramatic Play/Housekeeping center. I keep books in all my centers. Here are some excerpts from the book:

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Excerpt from Brown Angels by Walter Dean Myers

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Excerpt from Brown Angels by Walter Dean Myers

Brown Angels: An Album of Pictures and Verse by Walter Dean Myers

HarperCollins. 1993.

I recommend this book for: All ages.

Retail Hardcover: ? Rodney’s: $6.00 

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Ashley Bryan: Words to my Life’s Song – an autobiography. Photographs by Bill McGuinness. Illustrations by Ashley Bryan. Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing 2009.

This book can be used in any age classroom. It is dynamic. I picture high school art classes critiquing Bryan’s many medium’s used in his art. I picture elementary school classrooms engaged in it’s storyline and vibrant images, learning to appreciate art & history. Ashley Bryan is a celebrated artist and picture book illustrator, a three-time Coretta Scott King award winner. He was raised in the Bronx, New York. His parents were from Antigua, British West Indies.

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Excerpt from Ashley Bryan: Words to my Life’s Song

Excerpt from Ashley Bryan: Words to my Life's Song. Illustration of Langston Hughes by Ashley Bryan

Excerpt from Ashley Bryan: Words to my Life’s Song. Illustration of Langston Hughes by Ashley Bryan

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“I set the sea-glass pieces on tinfoil and connected the pieces with pulp. When the maché dried, I peeled the tinfoil away and the maché held the pieces together. When held to the light, the pieces glowed like stained glass.” – Ashley Bryan.

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“During the Depression, children often made their own toys. They made soap-box wagons with old carriage wheels, scooters with boards and skates. And so did I.”

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“The Ashanti tribe have a saying they use to end their AFrican tales, which is just right for me to close mine with: This is my story. Whether it be bitter or whether it be sweet, take some of it elsewhere and let the rest come back to me.”- Ashley Bryan

Ashley Bryan: Words to my Life’s Song. An autobiography.

Photographs by Bill McGuinness. Illustrations by Ashley Bryan.

Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing. 2009.

I recommend this for: All ages.

Retail Hardcover: $18.99. Rodney’s: $6.00

If you use any of the above mentioned books in your classroom, or with your children, please comment below.

Thanks for reading,

The Picture Book Pusher.

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BHM Teacher Reads: The Other Black Bostonians.

The Other Black Bostonians: West Indians in Boston, 1900-1950. by Violet Showers Johnson.

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Author Violet Showers Johnson - Professor of History at Texas A&M.

Author Violet Showers Johnson – Professor of History at Texas A&M.

Since I am sharing a picture book a day, during Black History Month, I thought it selfish of me to not include books that the teacher is reading too.  Being a teacher in Boston Public I have know excuses for not being educated on the histories of my students’ cultures. I found this book almost a year ago, at Tom Sawyer Old Books and Prints in Allston, MA.

Thanks for reading The Picture Book Pusher.

BHM Children’s Read Alouds: Day 4: Joseph Boulogne

February 4 – Before There Was Mozart: The Story of Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-George by Lesa Cline – Ransome. Illustrated by James E. Ransome.

Genre: Non-Fiction. Biography

Biography: Joseph Boulogne – knight (chevalier), fencer, composer, violinist, royal music instructor, Colonel in French Revolution, abolitionist. 1739 – 1799.

Historical Time Period: Mid-late 1700’s.

Geographical Relevance: 1. Guadeloupe Islands in the West Indies. 2. Paris, France. 3. Senegal.

Authenticity: The author, Lesa Cline-Ransome, and the illustrator, James E. Ransome, are wife and husband. Lesa was an avid writer while attending the Pratt Institute in New York, a professional marketing-writer, and developed a love of picture books during her graduate program in Education. Her husband first encouraged her to put her skills and knowledge into picture book form, and from there she would research the history of her subjects while her young children napped. James’ illustrations, also researched, make for a complete story. What is rare and wonderful to see, in major publishing houses, is the author and illustrator creating the book together. Ideas are in agreement – facilitating the book’s authenticity.

Before There was Mozart. By Lesa and James Ransome. 2011

Before There was Mozart. By Lesa and James Ransome. 2011

Right: Author Lesa Cline-Ransome. Left: Illustrator James E. Ransome. (photo courtesy of Chronogram Magazine)

Right: Author Lesa Cline-Ransome. Left: Illustrator James E. Ransome.
(photo courtesy of Chronogram Magazine)

I hadn’t heard of this book, or the author, before I saw it in the window of The Book Rack in Arlington, MA., a little over a month ago. This book is rare in quality. The story is unique and has many layers: A boy, who’s mother was a first-generation slave captured from Senegal, yet was never a slave himself, because his father, the plantation Master, honored his son as his son. The father also acknowledged the mother. Joseph continually experienced both oppression and privilege throughout his life, making for a very dynamic position and perspective in the world. I recommend this book for all ages, although grade K2 and grade 1 will need some mindful scaffolding beforehand.

Thanks for reading The Picture Book Pusher.

K2 Read Alouds: Week 10: Eboné Tales

Week of November 18-22.

Monday

We had a field trip to the Boston Nature Center & Wildlife Sanctuary on Monday. One of our activities was to paint a mural on recycled paper, using bits of nature  to paint our strokes rather than bristled brushes. There was a book on a bench. So I read it to the children while they created our mural. The book was The Color Box by Dayle Ann Dodds. Illustrated by Giles Laroche.

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Tuesday

Eboné tale, The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton. Illustrated by Leo & Diane Dillon. The children asked if we could act out this story sometime. So I’ll have to fit it into the curriculum at some point, to appease the budding actors.

The Girl Who Spun Gold By Virginia Hamilton

The Girl Who Spun Gold
By Virginia Hamilton

Illustration by Leo & Diane Dillon for Virginia Hamilton's The Girl Who Spun Gold

Illustration by Leo & Diane Dillon for Virginia Hamilton’s The Girl Who Spun Gold

Wednesday

The Science teacher read the students a story, but I don’t know which one. Though, I’m sure it was awesome because our Science teacher is pretty awesome.

 Thursday and Friday

Eboné tale, Hewitt Anderson’s Great Big Life by Jerdine Nolen. Illustrated by Kadir Nelson.

We’ve begun creating miniature furniture for Hewitt, in the classroom. The kids have begun learning to sew as well. Thus far, the protagonist, Hewitt, has three hand-sewn pillows to rest his petite head on beds of plastic crate pieces and feathers. Photos to come.

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In the Listening Center

I picked up Nikki Giovanni’s Hip Hop Speaks to Children book & CD, for a steal at Rodney’s Used Bookstore in Cambridge.

hiphopcoverThanks for reading The Picture Book Pusher.

My March Trip to Frugal Book Store in Roxbury. 2013

I’m usually in this store every other month. Many of the picture books that I blog about, I purchased from Frugal Book Store.

“Changing minds one book at a time.” – Frugal Book Store

What I bought – Listed by Publisher:

Jump at the Sun/Disney. New York.

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Be Boy Buzz
Written by bell hooks.
Illustrated by Chris Raschka.
2002
Published for Jump at the Sun
New York

All boy. Big open heart. Sweet mind.

– hooks 2002.

That’s right. I am the last person in the country to buy, from an actual bookstore, a new, hard cover, first-edtion copy of bell hook’s Be Boy Buzz. That may be an exaggeration, but, as I mentioned in my previous blog post, bell hook’s children’s books are no longer in print. The owner of Frugal Book Store went down into the basement to find this for me. They didn’t even have it on the shelves.  Now I don’t have to fret over students eagerly borrowing my paperback edition. Frugal still has multiple copies of the paperback edition for sale, though! No other bookstore does. It’s a miracle to still see hook’s picture books on the shelf for sale still. It’s the way it should be.

The Skin i'm in  by Sharon G. Flake 1998 Published for Jump at the Sun New York

The Skin i’m in
by Sharon G. Flake
1998
Published for Jump at the Sun
New York

Winner of the Coretta Scott King/ John Steptoe New Voices Award. I bought this book for a few reasons: 1. I will buy any book that is an original publication of Jump at the Sun publishers. 2. I’ve been meaning to read Sharon G. Flake’s work. 3. I’m attracted to the plot: biracial teacher, identity issues.

You Don't Even Know Me by Sharon G. Flake 2010 Published for Jump at the Sun New York

You Don’t Even Know Me
by Sharon G. Flake
2010
Published for Jump at the Sun
New York

Now matter what I think I may understand,  I must constantly remind myself that: I know nothing! You Don’t Even Know Me is an obvious need-to-buy. This is the same book, I just learned about a few days ago for the first time, while I was trying to find out why Jump at the Sun publishing imprint no longer exists. This book was on the silhouette website page for Jump at the Sun, that I describe in my previous blog post. And here, Frugal Book Store has it! They are the only book store that I know of to still carry Jump at the Sun books.

Atheneum Books For Young Children: An imprint of Simon &  Schuster. New York

Jenny Reen and the Jack Muh Lantern 1996 Published for Atheneum Books for Young Readers New York

Jenny Reen and the Jack Muh Lantern
1996
Published for Atheneum Books for Young Readers
New York

Once upon a time,…there was a time of great tears…In this hardest of hard times there was still joy because there were children, children with round cheeks and round curls. Such a child was Jenny Reen.

– Smalls 1996

I bought this book because it is written by beloved children’s author Irene Smalls. Smalls, like other cherished children’s book authors, is experiencing THE HAND! Yup. The hand. Publishers who own the rights of many of her books, are no longer publishing them. I’ll write more about this method of oppression in a future blog post. Jenny Reen and the Jack Muh Lantern is one of Smalls’ books that she owns the rights to, and therefore it is alive and printing well! Irene, if you are reading this post, then I’d like to ask you: Can we do lunch? We live in the same city! Wadda yuh say?

Abrams Books for Young Readers. New York

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Maritcha: A Nineteenth Century American Girl
By Tonya Bolden
2005
Published for Abrams
New York

This is the true account of Maritcha Rémond Lyons; based off her autobiographical memoirs and scrap books. She was an assistant principal at Public School No. 83 in Brooklyn, New York. She passed away in 1929.  This book has been out for eight years, and I am just learning about it now. And I call myself a progressive teacher. Hmmph!  There’s just so much newly-exposed history. I am eager to uncover it. I owe it to my students. It is their history to know. It is a gem of a book.  The publishers did a fine job of including ample photos of Maritcha’s original journal and scrap book. Looking through it, I am flooded with the same feelings I get when looking through my great grandmother’s scrap book. She too, a New Yorker, Harlem bred.

Random House. New York

Harlem's Little Blackbird Written by Renée Watson Illustrated by Christian Robinson 2012 Published by Random House New York

Harlem’s Little Blackbird
Written by Renée Watson
Illustrated by Christian Robinson
2012
Published by Random House
New York

If my voice can take me around the world, what else can it do?

– Watson 2012.

This story is about Florence Mills. Harlem, bred.

Houghton Mifflin. Boston. New York.

These Hands By Margaret H. Mason Illustrated by Floyd Cooper 2010 Published by Houghton Mifflin Books For Children. Boston. New York

These Hands
By Margaret H. Mason
Illustrated by Floyd Cooper
2010
Published by
Houghton Mifflin Books For Children.
Boston. New York

These Hands is the biographical account of Joseph Barnett’s experiences while working in the 1950’s and 60’s, at the Wonder Bread factory. The Wonder Bread Corporation maintained great racial discrimination practices throughout the Civil Rights Movement and beyond.

A & B Publishing Group. Brooklyn, NY.

Nandi's Magic Garden Written by Ron Matthews Illustrated by David Jones (Year ?) A&B Publishers Group Brooklyn

Nandi’s Magic Garden
Written by Ron Matthews
Illustrated by David Jones
(Year ?)
A&B Publishers Group
Brooklyn

Just Us Books. Orange, NJ.

Land of the Four Winds Written by Veronica Freeman Ellis Illustrated by Sylvia Walker 1993 Just Us Books Orange, NJ.

Land of the Four Winds
Written by Veronica Freeman Ellis
Illustrated by Sylvia Walker
1993
Just Us Books
Orange, NJ.

African American Images. Chicago, IL.

Markita Written by Alissa Nash Illustrated by Doby London 1994 Published by African American Images Chicago

Markita
Written by Alissa Nash
Illustrated by Doby London
1994
Published by African American Images
Chicago

The Best Face of All Written by Wilesse A.F. Commissiong Illustrated by Buck Brown 1991 Published by African American Images Chicago

The Best Face of All
Written by Wilesse A.F. Commissiong
Illustrated by Buck Brown
1991
Published by African American Images
Chicago

The trip was well worth it. From their generous teacher discount, to their ever-expanding children’s section, complete with numerous academic and educational toys & activities. Knowledgable and friendly staff.

Also, children get a free book on their birthday!

Frugal Book Store is located:

Inside the Washington Park Mall
306 Martin Luther King Blvd.
Boston, MA 02119

617-541-1722

@FrugalBookstore 

facebook.com/Frugal.Books

Thanks for reading The Picture Book Pusher.

Charis Books and More: Your Independent Feminist Bookstore

Photo taken by me. In Little 5 Points, Atlanta. January 2013.

Photo taken by me. In Little 5 Points, Atlanta. January 2013.

I payed my first visit to this bookstore a few weeks ago, while down in Atlanta visiting friends. What’s most beautiful about this bookstore, is that it has such a large children’s section. One would think that it does not cater to the minds of the young; carrying only texts in feminist theory. Not at all. In fact, they carried a wide array of titles. Many of which I haven’t heard of before.

Children's section at Charis Books, in Atlanta.Photo taken by me. 2013.

Children’s section at Charis Books, in Atlanta.
Photo taken by me. 2013.

What I bought:

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The Biggest Kiss written by Joanna Walsh, illustrated by Judi Abbot
Published by Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books. 2011

“A kiss with honey, a kiss that’s yummy, a kiss on the elbow, a kiss on the tummy.” – Joanna Walsh

The Biggest Kiss is such an enjoyable read. Although, it may not be mindful of me to read it aloud with enthusiasm, to my students. It definitely encourages kissing. I want to read it to them, but the joy that I want it to induce, may turn into children taking liberties that they cannot. I already have some students that are overly zealous about touching and kissing their peers. (by touching I mean hugging, and grabbing, not ‘guidance counselor’ worthy “touching”). As a first-grade teacher, I practice the theory of “personal space”. No matter how much fun kisses on cheeks may be, it is not something that I can encourage them to do to each other. If another kid kisses another on the cheek, and the kissed child does not mind, then I don’t say anything, but if a child doesn’t like it, I must set boundaries.

Therefore, I will keep this book in the take-home Lending Library. Children can enjoy this story, at home with their families.

The Princess and the Pea. Retold by Rachel IsadoraPublished by Puffin. 2009.

The Princess and the Pea. Retold by Rachel Isadora
Published by Puffin. 2009.

I have much respect for author Rachel Isadora. Re-imaging fairytale classics. Yes. She has many titles in this series of retold fairytale classics. I will absolutely keep this book in the classroom for the children to read, and will read it aloud at some point. But I must tell you, that as a teacher, my acceptance of princess-focused literature is an flux.   I want to steer away from our culture’s long history of associating princess life with girlhood. The two main components of princess-themed literature that I aim to disassociate with girlhood are: the blonde-haired, blue-eyed standard, AND, prince charming!  Prince charming does not exhibit any qualities that one should seek in a mate. Prince charming’s character often resembles that of an abuser’s wooing stage. Blindly in-love with the princess, and wants to do everything for her because she is meek, fragile, worthy of worship and a caged life. Prince charming embodies ‘Chivalry’. Chivalry is a concept based on falsehoods. I sharpied the word out of our classroom’s dictionaries. That’s right.

Although this story does character a prince looking for a “real princess”, it also shows that princess look like any woman. The prince in the story cannot tell the difference between the two. Because, ladies and gentlemen, there is no difference. That is the message I will tell my students when reading it.

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I bought 2 coloring books by Jacinta Bunnel.
Girls Will Be Boys Will Be Girls Will Be…Coloring Book
by Jacinta Bunnell and Irit Reinheimer. Published by Soft Skull Press. 2004.
Sometimes the Spoon Runs Away with Another Spoon Coloring Book
by Jacinta Bunnel & Nathaniel Kusinitz.
Published by PM Press, and Reach And Teach.

I just had to get these two coloring books. I had never seen such books before. There are pages in them, that I will not photocopy for the children, but about half of the pages in each book, are appropriate for the public school classroom.  Some of the more appropriate pages, I include in my previous blog post: What’s in a Coloring Page Anyways?

Appalachian Elegy: Poetry and Place by bell hooks.Published by University Press of Kentucky. 2012.

Appalachian Elegy: Poetry and Place by bell hooks.
Published by University Press of Kentucky. 2012.

Ah bell hooks. Okay, so I did not buy this one for the classroom, but I can very well see myself including one or two of it’s poems in our June poetry unit.  I mostly include poetry written for adults in our poetry unit. See my previous blog post Poetry in Pictures.

If you are not familiar with the works of bell hooks, and you are an educator, then I highly recommend two of her books for you. Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom, and  All About Love: New Visions.

Here are some snapshots I took while in Charis Books. It was too beautiful not to capture.

Children's section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.Photo taken by me. 2013

Children’s section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.
Photo taken by me. 2013

Children's section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.Photo taken by me. 2013

Children’s section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.
Photo taken by me. 2013

Children's section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.Photo taken by me. 2013

Children’s section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.
Photo taken by me. 2013

Children's section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.Photo taken by me. 2013

Children’s section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.
Photo taken by me. 2013

Children's section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.Photo taken by me. 2013

Children’s section in Charis Books, Little 5 Points, Atlanta, GA.
Photo taken by me. 2013

First bookstore visit to ignite tears of joy in me. I cried twice over their beloved children’s section. I scoffed once over their non-existent teachers’ discount. If I was given no reason to scoff, my purchases would have been far greater. Non the less, I would  visit this bookstore again, next time I’m in Atlanta.

Charis Books and More

Located in Little 5 Points.

1189 Euclid Ave NE  Atlanta, GA 30307
(404) 524-0304

www.charisbooksandmore.com/

Teacher discount: 0%

Thank you for reading The Picture Book Pusher

Everyone’s Books: For Social Change and the Earth – A Bookstore*

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Everyone’s Books bookstore, located in Brattleboro, Vermont. Photo taken by…me. December 2012
Everyone’s Books: 25 Elliot St. Brattleboro, VT. 05301. (802) 254-8160.

Happy New Year!  Before the new year rang in, I visited a few bookshops for the first time. One being Everyone’s Books in Brattleboro, VT.  Fulfilling first time trip. Lovely, and mindful staff. Divinely engaging Children’s section. As always, it was a joy to come across so many titles that I had never heard of before. Bought a bunch.

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This is my “bunch” that I purchased. It may be a short stack, but it’s contents are enormous.

My purchases:

1. The Black Book of Colors, written by Menena Cottin, illustrated by Rosana Faría, is a book dedicated to colors, but you wouldn’t know it by looking at it.

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El Libro Negro De Los Colores was first published in Mexico in 2006.
First translated into English by Elisa Amado. Published by Groundwood Books/ House of Anansi Press. 2008. Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Distributed by Publishers Group West. Berkeley, California. Printed and bound in China.
Illustrations are raised black lines on black paper.

Upon opening the book, I read on the left-hand side, “Thomas says that yellow tastes like mustard, but is as soft as a baby chick’s feathers.” On the right-hand page I feel the feathers. I don’t see them. No yellow to see. Only yellow to feel. Don’t envision a baby board book. There’s no fluffy fuzzy chicky fur to feel. It’s a black page with raised, tactile feathers.

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But wait. There’s something else I’ve missed. Back on the left-hand side, above the written words, I see the same sentence in Braille. I feel it. I smile.  My mind brings me back to my elementary school,  Happy Hollow , in Wayland, Massachusetts. When I was in fourth grade, we were privileged enough to participate in the Just Like Me program. The program was my first introduction to Braille. I remember the program like it was yesterday; it was that effective. It was that educational.  I gained significant respect for people who have different physical challenges than me, and it also diminished fear and confusion I may have had over people who communicate differently. I often try to emulate those experiences for my own students now. And I can’t wait to offer this book to my students to appreciate.

“But black is the king of all the colors. It is as soft as silk when his mother hugs him.”

Kudos to the author for including such a powerful line of text.

Pluses & Minuses:

(+) The alphabet in Braille, is provided at the end of the book.

(-) There are no page numbers. Page numbers are a desired attribute for avid referencers, like myself.

 

2. I, Too, Am America by Langston Hughes, illustrated by Bryan Collier, is a gem of a book, and a must-have for all elementary classrooms. All.

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Published under the title, I, Too, Am America, by Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division New York, N.Y. 2012.
Text copyright by Langston Hughes, 1925.
Manufactured in China.
Illustrations rendered in mixed media.

As I’ve mentioned in previous blog posts, Langston’s work is already a staple in my classroom. Yet, his words never grow dull in the hearts of my young students.

"I, too, sing America. I am the darker brother." - Hughes

“I, too, sing America. I am the darker brother.” – Hughes

I look forward to sharing this book with a fellow teacher whom, I humbly admit, I often bump heads with. We are different, her and I. She teaches. I educate.*

“They send me to eat in the kitchen/ When company comes/But I laugh/And eat well/And grow strong.” – Hughes

The illustrator wrote a poignant introduction to this story. I won’t quote it in its entirety, but I will quote the historic facts he wrote.

“I fully acknowledge and appreciate the long hours, timeless dedication, and amazing dignity of the Pullman porters, African-American men who worked as caretakers to wealthy white passengers aboard luxury trains. This practice began after legal slavery ended.” – Bryan Collier

 

3.  You Are Healthy by Todd Snow, illustrated by Melodee Strong.

 

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You Are Healthy published by Maren Green Publishing Inc., Oak Park Heights, Minnesota . 2008.
Manufactured in China.
Illustrations are acrylic on wood.

It’s not exactly a story with a beginning, middle, and end. No character development either. But as a picture book, its simplicity,  beauty and accuracy make for an engaging and educational read.

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“You are healthy when you laugh and giggle”

 

4. Tales Told in Tents: Stories from Central Asia by Sally Pomme Clayton, illustrated by Sophie Hexheimer.

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Tales Told in Tents published by Frances Lincoln Limited, London, U.K. 2004
Printed by Star Standard Industries in Jurong Town, Singapore. 2008
Illustrations are pen, ink, and watercolor.

I don’t know about you, but I didn’t even know the countries in Central Asia existed when I was a child. This book of riddles, and storyteller tales, comes from the countries of Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tadjikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

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“The people called the horsehair fiddle the kobiz. And they carved a horse’s head on top of the kobiz, remembering how the horse of songs helped make the first fiddle.” – Pg. 50

The book comes complete with a glossary, and a map of Central Asia that illustrates each country and region’s major form of industry and trade.

 

5. Jonathan Green Coloring Book.

Yesss. Yes. Includes over 20 reprintable coloring pages of Jonathan Green’s famous paintings. Jonathan Green is an American painter and is part of the Gullah community.

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Jonathan Green Coloring Book published by Pomegranate Communications Inc., Petaluma, California. 2009.
For Pomegranate Europe Ltd., Warwickshire, UK.
Printed in Korea.

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Now all the boys and girls can color the bois & girls.
Dale School Choir. Coloring page 9

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This photo is perfect. It is anything.
Simple Pleasures. Coloring page 13.

 

6. Buddhist Painting Coloring Book.

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Buddhist Painting Coloring Book published by Pomegranate Communications Inc., Petaluma, California. 2009.
For Pomegranate Europe Ltd., Warwickshire, UK.
Asian Art Museum/ Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture
Printed in Korea.

Practice understanding architecture, my kiddies. Practice well. Have an airial view. You deserve it. Says I.

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Mandala with thunderbolts.
Coloring page 7.

7.  History of the Civil Rights Movement Coloring Book by Steven James Petruccio.

History-of-the-Civil-Rights-Movement-Coloring-Book-Petruccio-Steven-9780486478463

History of the Civil Rights Movement Coloring Book Published by Dover Publications Inc., Mineola, N.Y. 2010.
Manufactured in the United States by Courier Corporations.

Photo on 2013-01-27 at 22.16 #2

“The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of busing as a means of desegregating public schools on April 20, 1971. The decision was expected to assure that schools would be fairly integrated, enabling all students to receive equal educational opportunities, regardless of their race. “
– Petruccio.

We’re still working on this busing business though. I’m curious to know what questions my students may ask about this picture, when coloring it. I don’t know how to progressively, and effectively,  answer them yet.

 

Everyone’s Bookstore has the BEST teacher discount that I have ever come upon. 25% discount, plus tax exempt. 

I look forward to visiting this bookstore again.

* This post is an edited version.

Thank you for reading The Picture Book Pusher.