S.T.E.A.M.ing Up Afrofuturism at The Studio Museum in Harlem

Renegade Futurism

As a moderator for the Enlightenment, Strange Mathematics & Rhythmic Equations panel at The Studio Museum in Harlem I am tasked with generating questions for the panelists. Here’s the museum’s description:

Conceived in dialogue with the exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, this panel discussion will be moderated by Nettrice Gaskins, Ph.D. candidate and researcher at Georgia Tech’s Experimental Game Lab (EGL) (part of the Digital Media program at the School of Literature, Communication and Culture), and features artists Coco Fusco, Jacolby Satterwhite and Saya Woolfalk, whose works are included in the two exhibitions currently on view at the Studio Museum, The Shadows Took Shape and Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art. The program will introduce artists and their works in relationship to “STEAM” (science, technology, engineering, art, math) education. Presentations and discussion will explore topics such as fractal geometry, quantum physics and symmetry, and how…

View original post 970 more words

Advertisements

Study One: STEM-themed Picture Books

DSC_0700.JPG

Future Technologist

My interests in picture books come in phases. I get an idea of what I want my students to learn and then I begin hunting out the perfect picture books to support my teaching.  Hopefully, I can blog my studies, over a period of time, with each blog entry being another book. Currently, I am all about uncovering the perfect picture books that can spark my students’ interests in STEM-centered thinking and activities. Science Technology Engineering and Math. STEM. It’s the latest buzzword  buzz-acronym in the  K-12 world, so you may have heard it. Or maybe you haven’t heard it yet, but are still sufficiently fostering students’ minds in science, technology, engineering, and math activities.

DSC_0388.JPG

Future Marine Biologists

Each blog entry within a study will begin its title with the study number and entry number in short form. Example: S1E2 would represent “Study One, Entry two”. Followed by the blog entry’s unique title, and then ending with the study number and title of study. For example, the study number and title of my first study is, “Study One: STEM-themed Picture Books.

DSC_1111.JPG

Future Biochemists

I’m a Boston Public School (BPS) teacher, so it’s BPS’ student population that I have in mind, when researching STEM-themed picture books. Fortunately, Boston has such a diverse student body, that whatever your student population is, the books I study and blog about are surely to be relevant and highly beneficial to whomever you teach as well. My goal will be to discover less known picture books, and less known scientists. My second goal is to include books that are highly relevant, authentic, and well-written. Unfortunately, every good-intentioned picture book, is not written in a way that is purposeful, or mindful of it’s readers’ academic needs. If a good-intentioned and enticing picture book is not up-to-snuff, then I will state it as such in my post. I want to push caution, to my blog readers, towards ill-allegorical picture books masquerading as educational.

DSC_0589.JPG

Future Environmental Scientists

And with that, I leave you with a preview of some of the picture books I will be blogging about during Study One: STEM-themed Picture Books. One of the books I preview below, is not up-to-snuff for the classroom. Do you know which one it is, even before I blog about it? Let me know if you do! I would love for you to contribute your insights on the book’s shortcomings.

Some of the STEM-themed books I will be blogging about throughout the upcoming school year:

images-3

Maritcha: A Nineteenth Century American Girl
By Tonya Bolden
2005
Published for Abrams
New York

images-2

The Beeman
By Laurie Krebs. Illustrated by Valeria Cis
2008
Publisher: Barefoot Books
Boston, MA and London, UK

Dr. Dee Dee Dynamo's Mission to Pluto By Oneeka Williams, M.D. Illustrated by Valerie Bouthyette 2013 Publisher: Mascot Books Herndon, VA.

Dr. Dee Dee Dynamo’s Mission to Pluto
By Oneeka Williams, M.D.
Illustrated by Valerie Bouthyette
2013
Publisher: Mascot Books
Herndon, VA.

Senefer: A Young Genius in Old Egypt By Beatrice Lumpkin Illustrated by Linda Nickens 1992 Africa World Press, Inc. Trenton, NJ

Senefer: A Young Genius in Old Egypt
By Beatrice Lumpkin
Illustrated by Linda Nickens
1992
Publisher: Africa World Press, Inc.
Trenton, NJ

I'm Gonna Be! By Wade Hudson Illustrated by Culverson Blair 1992 Publisher: Just Us Books Orange, NJ

I’m Gonna Be!
By Wade Hudson
Illustrated by Culverson Blair
1992
Publisher: Just Us Books
Orange, NJ

images

What Color is My World?: The Lost History of African-American Inventors
By Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Raymond Obstfeld
Illustrated by Ben Boos and A.G. Ford
2012
Publisher: Random House

A Weed is A Flower By ALIKI 1988 Publisher: Aladdin 1965 Publisher: Turtleback Books

A Weed is A Flower
By ALIKI
1988 Publisher: Aladdin
1965 Publisher: Turtleback Books

The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind By William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer Illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon 2012 Publisher: Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Books. New York

The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind
By William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer
Illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon
2012
Publisher: Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Books.
New York

These books pictured above, are by no means a full representation of the books, I plan to study, relating to the STEM fields. These are all just books that I already know, and have read. Let’s see what else I discover in the weeks to come.

DSC_0596.JPG

Future Engineer. Future Architect

Thank you for reading The Picture Book Pusher.

* All photos taken by me,  The Picture Book Pusher.

Fear & Opportunity: How education can respond to digital natives

Amazingly well written, highly insightful, and relevant article, about how we as teachers educate, or don’t educate, students on using technology to learn. – The Picture Book Pusher

Sullivan Leadership

Many teachers have a real fear that students in the classroom are more tech savvy and process information differently than the teacher. Flat out terrifying for many teachers. I get it, as a teacher you are the captain of the ship steering the ship through the treacherous waters of adolescence. The captain must be master of his/her domain. Technology represents a mild form of mutiny with its allure of distraction and dissidence. Here’s my question does a ship captain fear a crew member who has spent more time on a boat than the noble captain? – I don’t know, depends.

The Marc Prensky’s term digital native has become somewhat popular, speaking to the gap in society between those who grew up before the most recent boom in the availability of technology and those who grew up during. While the term speaks to the acquisition of knowledge as well as the mastery of technology, digital immigrants (most adults) tend to just focus on the…

View original post 410 more words